Finishes

All of our finishes are available in a dull, satin or gloss lacquer.

crackle

The wood finish looks like it is peeling and cracking, giving it that worn antique look like it has been passed down from generation to generation. Because this method is extremely random, erratic and unpredictable it is not possible to achieve any kind of consistency.

distressing

The amount of distressing can vary from light to heavy depending upon the look you are trying to achieve. The distressing includes random dents, gouges, marks, worm holes and over sanding. Usually distressing is added to wood types that already have knots and character marks to give you that old rustic look.

faded sand-through

The wood is stained a color and given a clear coat of finish. Then it is sprayed a solid black color. The black is then partially sanded off to reveal the stain color underneath giving you a faded two tone color effect. Due to the random sanding no two doors will look alike

glazed*

There are two glazing options, one being the standard glazing and the other one highlighted glazing. Both require a solid color base applied to the wood (usually maple).

Standard Glazing
The glaze is brushed onto the surface to completely cover it. Then the glaze is wiped off with a rag leaving excess amounts of glaze in the corners and recessed areas with a small amount staying on the flat surfaces which softens the original base color with a two tone brush effect. Because of this process no two doors will look alike. The amount of glaze left on can vary from a heavy amount to a light amount.

Highlighted Glazing
The glaze is applied directly to the corners and recessed areas of the wood with an artist brush, leaving the flat surfaces their original solid base color. No two doors will look alike.

painted*

A solid color base is applied to the wood (usually maple) to give you a painted look with no visible wood grain.

sand-through*

A solid color base is applied to the wood (usually maple) to give you a painted look with no visible wood grain. Then the solid color is sanded off around the edges, corners and other areas to reveal the wood underneath. This gives you the old worn look. The amount of sand through can vary from light to heavy, depending upon the look you want to achieve. Due to the random sanding no two doors will look alike.

stained**

A stain is applied to the wood by hand then wiped with a rag for consistent color coverage. The stain color will be slightly darker on the end grain and veneers. Also, the stain can be slightly darker in areas if there are any marks, mineral streaks or knots on the board. No two boards are exactly the same and all wood accepts stain differently.

 
 

* Wood naturally expands and contracts, therefore the joints on the cabinets and the doors will do the same. Due to this expansion and contraction you may see hairline cracks in the finish at these joints. These are normal and cannot be avoided with painted cabinets.

** The end grain is softer than the other surfaces of the wood causing it to accept more stain, in turn making it appear darker. This cannot be avoided.

Note: MDF panels may be substituted in the doors and end panels of painted cabinets to help minimize the expansion and contraction of the door.